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Top 10 Oldest MLB Stadiums (Major League Baseball)

Kauffman Stadium

As the oldest professional sports league in North America, Major League Baseball has a rich history that spans over a century. And what better way to experience this history than by visiting one of its iconic stadiums? From Fenway Park – home of the Boston Red Sox since 1912 – to Wrigley Field, where the Chicago Cubs have played since 1916, these stadiums have stood the test of time. 

So take a trip down memory lane and discover the Top 10 Oldest MLB Stadiums that are still used today. 

From classic architecture to legendary moments, these iconic ballparks have it all. 

Ten Oldest Major League Baseball Stadiums

Dodger Stadium

 (Los Angeles Dodgers) – 1962

Dodger Stadium opened its doors in Los Angeles, California, in the spring of 1962. With over 56,000 seats, it is the largest baseball-only stadium in terms of seating capacity and holds the record for hosting the most World Series games (9). Despite being one of the newer additions, Dodger Stadium still showcases classic architecture and is known for its stunning views of the San Gabriel Mountains.

Fenway Park

 (Boston Red Sox) – 1912

Fenway Park has been home to the Boston Red Sox since it opened on April 20, 1912. With a capacity of just over 37,000 seats, it may be one of the smaller stadiums on this list, but it is loaded with history and charm. Fenway Park has its fair share of iconic features, from the Green Monster in the left field to Pesky’s Pole in the right. It also holds the record for the smallest foul territory in MLB, making it a challenging stadium for players and fans.

Fenway Park
Source: Wikimedia

Wrigley Field

 (Chicago Cubs) – 1916

Wrigley Field has been home to the Chicago Cubs on the north side of Chicago since 1916. Known for its ivy-covered outfield walls and iconic red marquee, this stadium has become a beloved landmark in Chicago. With a capacity of over 41,000 seats, it is the second-oldest active MLB stadium and has hosted numerous historic events, including Babe Ruth’s “Called Shot” in the 1932 World Series.

Wrigley Field
Source: Wikimedia

Angel Stadium of Anaheim

 (Los Angeles Angels) – 1966

Originally known as Anaheim Stadium, this ballpark became home to the Los Angeles Angels in 1966. With a capacity of over 45,000 seats, it is the fourth-oldest active MLB stadium. Although it has undergone several renovations, Angel Stadium maintains its classic mid-century modern design and is known for its picturesque views of the San Gabriel Mountains.

Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Source: Wikimedia

Kauffman Stadium

 (Kansas City Royals) – 1973

Kauffman Stadium – also known as “The K” – is located in Kansas City, Missouri, and has been home to the Kansas City Royals since it opened in 1973. With a capacity of over 37,000 seats, it is the sixth-oldest active MLB stadium. Known for its iconic fountains and scoreboard, Kauffman Stadium also holds the record for hosting the most post-season games without hosting a World Series.

Kauffman Stadium
Source: Wikimedia

Rogers Centre

 (Toronto Blue Jays) – 1989

Originally named the SkyDome, Rogers Centre became home to the Toronto Blue Jays in 1989. With over 49,000 seats, it was the first stadium to have a retractable roof and boasts a hotel attached to its outfield wall. Despite its modern features, Rogers Centre maintains a classic feel and has hosted numerous memorable moments, including Joe Carter’s walk-off home run to win the 1993 World Series.

Rogers Centre
Source: Wikimedia

 Tropicana Field

 (Tampa Bay Rays) – 1990

Located in St. Petersburg, Florida, Tropicana Field became home to the Tampa Bay Rays in 1998. With a capacity of over 25,000 seats, it is the smallest stadium on this list and one of only two MLB stadiums with a fixed roof. Despite its unique design, Tropicana Field has been home to many historical moments, including the first-ever inter-league game in 1997.

 Tropicana Field
Source: Wikimedia

Guaranteed Rate Field

 (Chicago White Sox) – 1991

Originally known as Comiskey Park II, this stadium was renamed Guaranteed Rate Field in 2016. Located on the south side of Chicago, it has been home to the Chicago White Sox since its opening in 1991. With a capacity of over 40,000 seats, it is known for its iconic exploding scoreboard and was the site of Michael Jordan’s brief baseball career.

Guaranteed Rate Field
Source: Wikimedia

Globe Life Park in Arlington

 (Texas Rangers) – 1994

Originally known as The Ballpark at Arlington, this stadium became home to the Texas Rangers in 1994. Located in Arlington, Texas, it has a capacity of over 48,000 seats and is known for its unique features, such as the “Home Run Porch” in right field and the manual scoreboard. It has also been the site of numerous historic moments, including Nolan Ryan’s 7th no-hitter in 1991.

Globe Life Park in Arlington
Source: Wikimedia

Chase Field

 (Arizona Diamondbacks) – 1998

Located in Phoenix, Arizona, Chase Field opened its doors in 1998 and has been home to the Arizona Diamondbacks ever since. With a capacity of over 48,000 seats, it is known for its retractable roof and swimming pool located in the right-center field. It has also hosted numerous memorable moments, including the Diamondbacks’ World Series victory in 2001. 

These iconic stadiums not only hold a special place in the hearts of baseball fans but also serve as symbols of the rich history and tradition of Major League Baseball. Whether you visit to witness a game or simply to soak up the nostalgia, these ten oldest MLB stadiums will leave a lasting impression. 

Chase Field
Source: Wikimedia

Frequently Asked Questions

Which is the oldest MLB Stadiums?

The oldest MLB stadium is Fenway Park, home to the Boston Red Sox. It opened on April 20, 1912, and continues to serve as a treasured sporting venue steeped in history and charm.

What is the Smallest MLB Stadium?

The smallest MLB stadium in terms of seating capacity is Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida, home to the Tampa Bay Rays. It can accommodate over 25,000 spectators, making it the smallest among all Major League Baseball stadiums.

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